Everyday Abolition/Abolition Every Day

amplifying our everyday resistance to the prison industrial complex

Freedom Harvest: Rise Of The Dandelions

We use the dandelions as a source of freedom. We re imagine our communities as a source of resilience and medicine. I am a part of a growing movement that is fighting for the Dignity and Power of Incarcerated people, their families and communities. We are currently under the formation of the Coalition to End Sheriff Violence in L.A.Jails (www.endsheriffviolence.org). I am the founder and lead organizer of this current project that is looking at the ways state violence directly impacts and perpetuates the p.i.c. I am also an artist and have been developing art that highlights trauma and resilience. Our coalition hosts an artist collective called Freedom Harvest: Rise of the Dandelions, a growing movement of organizers, activist, artists, and creators attempting to re-imagine the ways in which state violence impacts the imagery in our communities. We chose the dandelion a weed as a symbol of hope, resilience, medicine and strength. The dandelion grows EVERYWHERE and is highly medicinal, although often dis-regarded as a just a weed. The dandelion, like our people can operate as a tool for healing. We see the seeds of the dandelion spreading and pollinating the messages of abolition.

rise of the dandelions
rise of the dandelions. Drawing by: Gonji Lee and Graphic by: Street Inc Media

dandelion image by Kitzia Esteva and flyer by Gabriel Strachota

photo  Mark-Anthony Johnson

photo by Renee Bever poem by Patrisse Cullors

Tai Nyobi

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This entry was posted on April 23, 2013 by .
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